[Tutorial] Non-poster overlay

Discussion in 'Tutorials & Resources' started by SPHinx, Nov 26, 2009.

  1. SPHinx

    SPHinx L2: Junior Member

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    EDIT: I removed the tutorial from my site (and with it, all the pictures). Upon reflection, I was not happy with the result. I will fix it up here in the next day or so.

    Sorry for any inconvenience.
     
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    Last edited: Dec 19, 2009
  2. Nutomic

    Nutomic L11: Posh Member

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    I cant seem to find any different in those? :O

    I dont know what you mean with non-poster, but if its about what the picture shows, this tutorial is more than un-necessary.

    And putting it directly into your post wouldnt be bad either.
     
  3. shdw.puppet

    shdw.puppet L2: Junior Member

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    I think the difference is the transparency of the background so it is meant to go straight on a building whereas a poster is more of a stand alone piece of material. Think = poster sphinx = paint on or decal.

    Nice tutorial mate, good to see some people posting things for noobs like me :p
     
  4. SPHinx

    SPHinx L2: Junior Member

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    You're right that it's pretty much the same as Nineaxis' guide. I learned most of this stuff from reading his post. That's why I flagged his earlier work in the beginning. Clever folks who read Nineaxis' guide probably don't need this. And really clever folks didn't need a tutorial to begin with.

    The difference between the two is in the filters used and the treatment of the images. It's not based on an image outline (which Nineaxis does remarkably well, but I find frustrating), no weathering, the background is transparent (as Shdw.puppet points out), and the foreground should be partially transparent. I could have just posted that as a reply to Nineaxis' guide, but I'm trying (albeit slowly) to write up a collection of tutorials to help beginners (and me in the process). Since I learned from others, there will be plenty of redundant information.
     
  5. Washipato

    Washipato L3: Member

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    It can prove useful, thanks. It would be better if you have the tutorial here and write a link to the original work at the beggining of the post.

    Which font did you use? And what kind of fonts do you say that would fit better this kind of works?
     
  6. SPHinx

    SPHinx L2: Junior Member

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    The bolder and blockier the font, the better. The "western" and "eroded" sections of dafont.com both have some excellent choices.

    The font I've used in this tutorial is called "Kirsty Bold". It's a part of the LarabieFont package. When I was still using Linux, I just downloaded these with my package manager. Now that I'm using Windows, I downloaded the package from the debian repositories, extracted the .tar.gz or whatever it's called, and installed the fonts manually.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2009