Proper brush & texture alignment.

Discussion in 'Mapping Questions & Discussion' started by Infi^, Jun 5, 2013.

  1. Infi^

    Infi^ L1: Registered

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    Something that's bothered me for a long time is that Valve maps seem to use no texture alignment options, with everything or mostly everything set to x 0 and y 0. How the hell do they do this and still get the texture alignment to look fine?

    Is it some kind of brush alignment technique planned before? This is something that bothers me because lets say I'm making a room:

    128 units wall height. How would you place the ceiling and floor brushes to prevent odd looking textures and optimisation problems.

    |_|
    The floor part trims a part of the wall texture at the bottom.

    Would you use the same ceiling brush as a floor brush in multi-story buildings etc?

    It's a bit hard to explain but hopefully someone understands what I mean.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
  2. Beetle

    Beetle L9: Fashionable Member

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    Are you talking about aligning textures so two of the same texture on two different brush faces is completely aligned?

    If so, I think what you mean is alt+rightclicking while applying a texture (select the brush face beside the one you want to align it to first).

    If you're talking about how repeating textures always line up so they don't look bad, that's just good planning and knowing the size of the textures.
     
  3. Infi^

    Infi^ L1: Registered

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    No that's not really what I mean.

    http://puu.sh/390pF
    http://puu.sh/390qI

    Or is it the simple case of you want a 128 unit wall, so you make it 128+16+16= 160 units because the wall and ceiling are going to take up 16 units of the wall texture?
     
  4. Beetle

    Beetle L9: Fashionable Member

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    That's pretty much all it is, if I'm understanding you right. or you just line up the wall so the corner of the wall and corner of the floor/ceiling touch but the faces don't.

    If you don't want to do that, you can also line up the brush how it will appear to the player, texture it, then move it down. If texture lock isn't on the texture will stay in place.

    [​IMG]

    Neither are wrong, but I tend to use the first one.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2013
  5. bob+M|M+

    bob+M|M+ L6: Sharp Member

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    use #1 from above, or diagonal cut overlapping brushes, nodrawing all other sides for best optimization

    #2 is worse for optimization + you get funky lighting. if you must overlap, let the base overlap, and the wall sit on top, then cut the floor where it overlaps. this will help lighting.
     
  6. Fish 2.0

    Fish 2.0 L6: Sharp Member

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    How is #2 worse?
     
  7. Beetle

    Beetle L9: Fashionable Member

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    I think the optimization difference would be negligible, but it's a good point about the lighting.

    I like doing it like #1 because everything lines up better and you don't have to worry about what the OP is talking about.