Angled Brushes

Discussion in 'Mapping Questions & Discussion' started by MegapiemanPHD, Mar 13, 2016.

  1. MegapiemanPHD

    aa MegapiemanPHD Doctorate in Deliciousness

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    I've been having a hard time trying to figure out how people do things with angled brushes. I can make an angled brush easy but I can't figure out how you make an angled brush with something like a window in it, like at the final area of Upward. No matter how much I mess around with the angle, the only points that fit on the grid are where it starts and where it stops. If I try to put a window in it, everything isn't going to line up.

    My question is this:

    How do I make an angled brush that fallows the grid.
     
  2. Moonrat

    aa Moonrat The end of an era

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    • Agree Agree x 1
  3. MegapiemanPHD

    aa MegapiemanPHD Doctorate in Deliciousness

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    An instance may work for something like a whole building or section but I'm just talking about a singular wall. Plus instances are far beyond my understanding

    This is an example of the kind of thing I'm trying to replicate:
     

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  4. ProfHappycat

    ProfHappycat L3: Member

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    i sorta cut the brushes at an angle with the clipping tool to make the window hole and use the vertex tool to scale it around
    also you can use the vertex tool to put a window in there
     
  5. MegapiemanPHD

    aa MegapiemanPHD Doctorate in Deliciousness

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    That's something I've looked into but so far I can't get every angle to match. The side angles match but the one for the window dosn't. This is because only the ends of the angles go through grid intersections. What I'm looking for is information on how to keep an angled brush on the grid since no matter how much I move the angle around or change it, it never lines up.
     
  6. MoonFox

    MoonFox L10: Glamorous Member

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    angled brushes can be made with vertex move tool, the grey block with the red corners; it should be the last object on your left toolbar, unless you have reorganized it or moved it. this allows you to remain geometrical on grid spaces. The caveat to it being that some lines will not align as the directional paths are asymmetrical and not evenly spaced. the work around for windows are a 5 section object with four of the five being the wall itself. two parallel to the top and bottom, and two perpendicular to the lines... it should be like a box trapped within a box, with the top and bottom cut directionally parallel to the parameters of the inner square. |[]|
     
  7. radarhead

    aa radarhead Level 20 "Mapper"

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    Just make sure the slopes of your angled walls are short fractions like 1/1, 1/2, or 1/4. This way you can easily line up smaller brushes along these intervals.
     
  8. ProfHappycat

    ProfHappycat L3: Member

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    there's emotes for that :vertexmanip:
     
  9. MoonFox

    MoonFox L10: Glamorous Member

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    :vertexmanip: OH DAMN! did not see that button there
     
  10. Moonrat

    aa Moonrat The end of an era

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    Why don't you just build it on the grid, then rotate it and use the vertex tool to get it to line up. In this case that what I'd do
     
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  11. Pocket

    aa Pocket func_croc

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    The stuff in Upward you're talking about is at a 45 degree angle; that should be really easy to replicate. Have you downloaded a decompile of it and looked at it in the 2D views? Generally, Valve makes its 45-degree walls three diagonals thick on whatever grid scale makes a regular wall four spaces thick, so they meet at a 2:1 slant, like this:

    [​IMG]

    Which is pretty close to equal thickness and keeps everything perfectly on grid. It pretends that 3√2 = 4, which is close enough to not be noticeable in a video game.

    But in Upward, for some reason, the walls you're looking meet at a straight line like this:

    [​IMG]

    Which of course makes the diagonal ones thinner. It's not a huge deal, but worth pointing out. Regardless of which method you use, the vertex tool ought to be able to handle whatever you're throwing at it.
     
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